Greed’s influence on policy

Someone who read Black Collar left a review asking why Congress tends to ignore the will of the people in favor of policies that enrich the upper class. Is it “simple greed” the reviewer pondered. Great question. Here’s my response:

First, thank you to everyone who read Black Collar. These positive reviews are the best motivation, and I appreciate them so much. I’ve receive a lot of reviews lately, so if I don’t answer your question on here, feel free to email me directly. But I’m going to answer this one.

Regarding whether policy choices are motivated by greed, I think that’s a question with a complex answer. Research by Martin Gilens tells us that 70% of Americans have zero influence on public policy. They are completely disenfranchised from the political system–not because they don’t vote, but because money in a much greater indicator of policy influence. So, part one of the problem is that many Americans just don’t have a voice in Washington, D.C., because they can’t afford one. How we spend our money is more important than the box we check on the ballot, although I like to think that matters, too.

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